8 Scary Effects Of Overeating And Proven Ways To Stop

For most people, overeating isn’t something they do intentionally. In fact, the majority of people overeat every day simply by misjudging their serving sizes! Restaurants don’t make it any easier. They offer large plates for relatively low prices, which makes it nearly impossible not to overeat just because it’s in front of you.

8 Scary Affects of Overeating and Proven Ways to Stop

Other people turn to food when they are emotionally upset or bored because it can be comforting. Your body may also crave more food than you really need if you’re deficient in certain nutrients or have digestive problems that make it hard for you to absorb nutrition. Whatever the reason is for overeating, it comes with scary consequences. Here’s what happens to your body when you overeat and tips for putting a stop to the madness.

What Happens When You Overeat?

Sure, eating a few extra calories here and there isn’t a big deal, especially if you’re active. You can easily make up for it the next day by not eating as much. But what happens when you overeat daily at every meal? Whether it’s intentional or not, your eating habits can greatly impact your health.

1. Your Blood Sugar Rises (And Then Crashes)

Your Blood Sugar Rises Overeating Affects & Ways To Stop

 

Most people tend to overeat foods that are easy to indulge in. Let’s face it. No one overeats vegetables or a salad. So what’s the most satisfying food you can think of? It’s probably very likely to be something that is high in carbohydrates, like pizza, tacos, or a greasy burger and fries. When you overeat carbs, your body has to work harder to produce enough insulin to deliver the glucose from your blood to your cells where it can be used as energy. If your body can’t get your glucose to your cells fast enough or it has a hard time producing enough insulin, then guess what happens to your blood sugar. You guessed it. It goes up! And what goes up must come down.

When your body does finally transport all of your glucose away from your blood, you will inevitably experience a sugar crash or a drop in your blood sugar levels. To make up for this drop in blood sugar, your body craves more sugar that can replace your falling levels. But when you eat smaller meals that are portioned better, your body can deliver the perfect amount of energy to your cells without spiking or crashing.

2. You Gain Weight

You gain weight Overeating Affects & Ways To Stop

 

Speaking of blood sugar levels, did you know that insulin is basically a fat-storing hormone? As mentioned above, it delivers glucose to your cells. But when happens when you overeat? Your cells can only take in so much glucose. The rest is delivered to your fatty tissues where it is deposited and stored as fat until you can use it for energy later. But if you never use this energy and just keep adding more on to the pile, then imagine how much fat you accumulate just by eating too much.

3. You Get Tired

Have you ever noticed that all you want to do is take a long nap after eating a big meal? That’s because you’ve put so much stress on your organs by overeating that they have to work overtime just to digest your food. Keep in mind that mealtime is not a time to stuff yourself so full that you can’t function any longer. Food’s just is to supply you with energy and nutrition. When you eat too much of it, all of your energy must go to your digestive system to try to break down this meal as quickly as it can so you can go back to your normal, human ways. Taking a nap might not sound all that bad, but it’s never good when it’s in the middle of your day, and you have responsibilities to handle.

4. Your Stomach Swells

Your stomach Swells overeating

 

Is there anything worse than the way your stomach feels after you eat too much? We think not. When you overeat, it causes your stomach to bloat and expand much like a balloon to accommodate the large amount of food you just ate. The swelling pushes against your other organs, which makes your entire abdominal area uncomfortable and feel like you need to unbutton your pants.

5. You Get Gassy

To a certain extent, everyone gets gassy from time to time. But it’s not normal. Intestinal gas and bloating is your body’s way of saying, “Don’t eat that.” Or sometimes, “I don’t mind that you’re eating this but don’t eat too much of it.” Think about this. Every time you swallow food, you’re letting air enter your gastrointestinal tract. This air causes your digestive system to expand, which makes you feel bloated. So where does this air go? It needs to be pushed out of one or two ends (we’ll let you figure out where), which makes you a less than pleasant dinner guest to sit next to.

6. You Get Heartburn

you get heartburn overeating

 

When you eat more than what your stomach can hold, it tends to back up in your esophagus, which causes heartburn. That burn you feel is from hydrochloric acid, which is an acid in your stomach that is needed to break down your food. The more you eat, the more of it is required to break down your food, and sometimes you can feel a burning sensation in your heart due to the backing up of stomach acid that you can quite literally taste in your throat. Sure, you can take an antacid to calm down the stomach acid production, but your stomach needs this acid to break down the meal you just ate. So you’ll be working against it by toning down the acid. The best thing to do is to avoid overeating in the first place.

7. Your Hormones Become Imbalanced

Anyone with a hormone or thyroid problem knows how easy it is to throw your hormones out of whack, and a big meal can do just that. Leptin is a hormone that your fat cells make. Its job is to control your hunger cues. When you eat too much or too fast, you could miss the signal that leptin is trying to get to your brain by telling you, “Hey, stop eating! I’m full!” This causes you to make produce more leptin until you finally start to listen to your hunger cues (by then, it’s usually too late). Eventually, your body begins to give up and starts to become resistant to your leptin levels, which makes it harder for you to recognize when you’re full.



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