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34 Foods High in Vitamin C to Keep You Healthy

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34 Foods high in Vitamin C- to keep your immune system strong & you healthy.

Vitamin C is an antioxidant and an essential aspect of a healthy and working body. It helps ensure the health and maintenance of your tendons, bones, and skin, and it also helps your immune system deal with damaging substances in the body. Make sure you’re getting enough in your diet by eating plenty of foods high in vitamin C.

Guavas

Guavas are considered by many to be a super food, thanks to their rich vitamin and mineral contents. One of those abundant vitamins is the antioxidant vitamin C. One guava fruit contains 125.57mg of vitamin C, which is over twice of the recommended daily total. Guava fruits are also high in fiber, which helps with digestive health. Serving Size (1 guava), 125.57 milligrams of vitamin C (209% DV), 37 calories

Chili Powder

One tablespoon of flavorful chili powder provides your body with 5.13mg of essential vitamin C. That adds up to about 8% of what the average adult should consume in a day. It’s a surprising source of antioxidants and minerals, so add more to your favorite dishes and start enjoying the health benefits at your next meal. Serving Size (1 tablespoon), 4.8 milligrams of vitamin C (8% DV), 23 calories

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Yellow Bell Peppers

Bell peppers are sweet and colorful veggies that should have a welcome place in your diet. If you aren’t sure how to eat more of them, try adding them to the sauce in your next pizza or pasta dish. They add a great flavor and a powerful nutritional boost to your favorite meals, thanks to their high level of vitamin C. Serving Size (1 bell pepper), 341.31 milligrams of vitamin C (569% DV), 50 calories

Cauliflower

A serving size of one cup of cauliflower provides your body with 46.4mg of vitamin C, or just over three-quarters of the amount the average adult should consume per day. Cauliflower makes a great addition to your diet, not just for its vitamin C content, but for its many nutritional qualities and its low calorie count. Serving Size (1 cup), 46.4 milligrams of vitamin C (77% DV), 25 calories

Fresh Thyme

Fresh and dried herbs are packed as tightly with nutrients as they are with wonderful flavor. For vitamin C, choose fresh thyme to add to some of your favorite meals. One tablespoon contains 1.2mg, or 2% of the daily recommended intake. If the weather is appropriate, get some fresh thyme from your local nursery to add to your garden, and you’ll have a fresh supply all summer. Serving Size (1 teaspoon), 1.2 milligrams of vitamin C (2% DV), 1 calories

Brussels Sprouts

A one-cup serving of flavorful Brussels sprouts contains 663.52mg of vitamin C, which is 13% of the daily recommended value for the average adult. Brussels sprouts are a great addition to your diet, regardless of whether or not you’re trying to get more vitamin C; they’re also a great source of vitamin K, potassium, folate, and iron. Serving Size (100 grams), 62 milligrams of vitamin C (103% DV), 36 calories

Kale

Raw kale has traditionally been used as a garnish, but when it’s included regularly in your diet, you’ll enjoy the many health benefits this nutritional powerhouse provides. For example, it’s highly rich in antioxidants such as vitamins A and C. Just one cup of chopped kale brings more than the daily recommended amount of vitamin C. It’s also a rich source of iron, copper, calcium, sodium, and potassium. Serving Size (1 cup), 80.4 milligrams of vitamin C (134% DV), 33.5 calories

Chili Peppers (Green)

There are several colorful (and flavorful) varieties of hot peppers. In order to get lots of vitamin C in your diet, choose the green ones; a single green hot chili pepper provides 182% of the daily recommended value of vitamin C. Peppers are also a great source of several other antioxidants and minerals, so if you can handle the spicy taste, include more in your diet and enjoy the many health benefits. Serving Size (1 pepper), 109.13 milligrams of vitamin C (182% DV), 18 calories

Fresh Parsley

Fresh herbs such as parsley make a great addition to your meals, both for their flavor and their health benefits. Fresh parsley is high in vitamin C; one tablespoon provides 9% of the daily recommended amount. It’s also a good source of potassium, calcium, magnesium, vitamin A, and B vitamins. Serving Size (1 tablespoon), 5 milligrams of vitamin C (8% DV), 1.3 calories

Mustard Greens

The next time you’re enjoying a healthy salad, use mustard greens and other dark, leafy greens as the base. One cup of chopped mustard greens provides 39.2 milligrams of vitamin C. Mustard greens are also high in minerals such as calcium and folate, as well as vitamin A and vitamin K. Serving Size (1 cup), 39.2 milligrams of vitamin C (65% DV), 14.6 calories

Apples

Apples aren’t known for being high in vitamin C, but they contain about 10% of your daily recommended value per cup. They also provide a good amount of antioxidants, such as quercetin, which has amazing anti-aging abilities. Eat this snack raw or add chopped apples to salads and smoothies. Serving Size (1 cup), 5.7 milligrams of vitamin C (10% DV), 65 calories

Dried Rosemary

If you use dried herbs such as rosemary in your cooking, you’re already aware of the great flavor they add to many dishes. But you might be surprised to learn about some of the health benefits they add to your diet. Dried rosemary is a good source of folic acid, vitamin A, iron, potassium, calcium, and vitamin C. Serving Size (1 tablespoon), 2 milligrams of vitamin C (3% DV), 10 calories

Chili Peppers (Red)

There are several varieties of hot chili peppers, but both green and red peppers are a great source of vitamin C. A serving size of one red hot chili pepper provides an impressive 108% of the daily recommended value of vitamin C. These spicy veggies are also a good source of vitamin A, vitamin K, and manganese. Serving Size (1 pepper), 64.67 milligrams of vitamin C (108% DV), 18 calories

Turnip Greens

The green, leafy tops of the turnip plant make an excellent addition to your diet, just like the turnips themselves do. One cup of raw turnip greens provides 39.5 mg of the antioxidant vitamin C. That’s over half the total amount that is recommended daily for the average adult. Add more turnip greens and other dark leafy veggies like it to your diet, and you’ll enjoy the many nutritional benefits. Serving Size (1 cup), 39.5 milligrams of vitamin C (66% DV), 29 calories

Garden Cress

Garden cress is another leafy green that’s great for your health all around. It’s commonly used as a garnish, but you can enjoy it often to get plenty of energy and nutrients into your diet. One cup of garden cress leaves contains fiber, protein, vitamin A, folate, calcium, iron, and enough vitamin C to fill over half the recommended quota for the day. Serving Size (1 cup), 34.5 milligrams of vitamin C (58% DV), 16 calories

Broccoli

If you’re looking to protect yourself during flu season by boosting your immune system, broccoli might not be the first thing you think of. But adding just one cup of chopped raw broccoli will provide you with 81.18mg of vitamin C, enough to cover your vitamin C intake 135% for the entire day. Serving Size (1 cup), 81.17 milligrams of vitamin C (135% DV), 31 calories

Kiwi

The sweet kiwi fruit may be small, but it packs a punch when it comes to antioxidants such as vitamin C. Enjoy just one kiwi fruit and you’ll bless your body with 141% of the vitamin C it needs for the day. Enjoy a succulent kiwi on its own as a snack, as part of an immune-system-boosting fruit salad, or in a hearty fruit smoothie. Serving Size (1 kiwi), 84.36 milligrams of vitamin C (141% DV), 56 calories

Pineapples

The tropical pineapple makes a healthy and flavorful addition to a fruit salad or smoothie, and it’s great when stir fried with shrimp, ham, or pork. One cup of pineapple chunks provides your body with 131% of the recommended daily value of vitamin C. In addition to boosting your vitamin C intake, pineapples can help strengthen your bones, alleviate arthritis, and help with digestion, thanks to their bromelain levels. Serving Size (1 cup), 78.87 milligrams of vitamin C (131% DV), 83 calories

Tomatoes

When most people think of tomatoes, they think of lycopene, which can have antioxidant properties. Another antioxidant found in tomatoes is vitamin C. One medium tomato provides your body with one-quarter of the vitamin C the average adult needs in a day, while contributing only 22 calories to your diet. Serving Size (1 medium tomato), 15.6 milligrams of vitamin C (26% DV), 22 calories

Banana Peppers

Banana peppers make a great topping on pizza, sandwiches, and burgers, and not just because of their great flavor. Banana peppers contain vitamin A, protein, and vitamin C, but they’re low in fat and calories. Banana peppers are a good choice for those who enjoy foods that are spicy, but not too spicy. Serving Size (1 cup), 103 milligrams of vitamin C (171% DV), 33.5 calories

Red Cabbage

Most people are familiar with green cabbage, but did you know that red cabbage is also a viable source of vitamin C, as well as many other vitamins and minerals? One cup of chopped fresh red cabbage provides 190 mg of vitamin C, 4666 of vitamin A, 3g of fiber, and only 46 calories. If you enjoy green cabbage, try adding some red cabbage into the mix every once in a while. Serving Size (1 cup), 190  milligrams of vitamin C (317% DV), 46 calories

Papaya

If you need more vitamin C, it doesn’t get much better than papayas. One cup of papaya fruit contains 86.5 mg of vitamin C. That’s well over what the average person should consume in an entire day. Give your immune system a boost with this delicious and colorful fruit, and you’ll be providing your body with several other benefits as well, including vitamin A, vitamin B, calcium, and potassium. Serving Size (one cup), 86.5 milligrams of vitamin C (144% DV), 54 calories

Strawberries

One cup of sliced strawberries brings more than enough vitamin C into your body to fill the average adult’s recommended quota for the day. Strawberries make a great side item at breakfast time, a healthy and colorful addition to a salad or fruit smoothie, and a sweet yet healthy treat after dinner. Serving Size (1 cup), 89.4 milligrams of Vitamin C (149% DV), 48.6 calories

Sun-Dried Tomatoes

Sun-dried tomatoes have become a popular food, and it’s easy to see why. They’re a great source of vitamin C, vitamin K, potassium, and iron. You can purchase sun-dried tomatoes that are packed in oil at the grocery store, or you can make your own using a food dehydrator. However you manage to get them into your home, get them into your diet quickly to enjoy the many health benefits (and great flavor) they’re known and loved for. Serving Size (1 cup), 21.2 milligrams of Vitamin C (35% DV), 139 calories

Chives

One tablespoon of chopped chives adds a delightfully mild onion flavor as well as a spattering of vitamins and minerals to your meals. Chives are a good source of vitamin C, and they can help in lowering cholesterol, preventing cancer, and lowering blood pressure. For serving ideas, start by adding chopped chives to your scrambled eggs, soups, and mashed potatoes. Serving Size (1 tablespoon), 1.74 milligrams of vitamin C (3% DV), 1 calorie

Dried Basil

Dried herbs tend to be denser in flavor than their fresh equivalents, so if you’re opting for dried herbs, choose basil for its vitamin C content. Just one tablespoon contains 1% of the recommended daily value for most adults, and its calorie count in negligible. Dried basil generally goes well with dishes in which olives, garlic, or tomatoes are a prominent ingredient. Serving Size (1 tablespoon), 0.3 milligrams of vitamin C (1% DV), 1.3 calories

Cantaloupe

Melons are high in vitamin C, with a one cup serving of cantaloupe providing 108% of the daily recommended value. Cantaloupe also promotes lung health, prevents heart disease, and reduces stress. In addition to vitamin C, it’s high in vitamin A and potassium. Serving Size (one cup), 65 milligrams of vitamin C (108% DV), 60 calories

Dried Coriander

Dried coriander, which is the seed part of the plant, is often used in Asian, Latin, and Mediterranean cuisine. It’s a great source of vitamin C and magnesium, but most people are more concerned with the delightful but subtle flavor it adds to many dishes. Incorporate more dried coriander into your meals to enjoy the many health benefits it brings to your diet. Serving Size (1 tablespoon), 9.9 milligrams of vitamin C (17% DV), 4.9 calories

Ground Cloves

Like many spices, ground cloves are a potent source of vitamin C, considering the small quantities that are used in cooking. One tablespoon of ground cloves provides 5.3 mg of vitamin C, or 9% of the daily value. Ground cloves are commonly used in Indian and Asian cuisine, and they can also be used to aid in digestion. Serving Size (1 tablespoon), 5.3 milligrams of vitamin C (9% DV), 21 calories

West Indian Cherries

If you need a boost of vitamin C, West Indian Cherries are one of the best ways to get your fill. One cup of these nutrient-rich fruits contains almost 3000% of the amount of vitamin C the average adults needs for an entire day. Cherries are also high in fiber, so they’re a great food to eat when you’re feeling bloated or constipated. Serving Size (1 cup), 1644.05 milligrams of vitamin C (2740% DV), 31 calories

Mangoes

Mangoes are a colorful and flavorful fruit, and they’re filled with vitamins and minerals to keep you looking healthy and feeling good. The average mango contains nearly your entire recommended amount of vitamin C for the day. Mangoes are also a great source of vitamins A, E, and B6, as well as minerals such as fiber, copper, and potassium. Serving Size (1 mango), 57.34 milligrams of vitamin C (96% DV), 135 calories

Saffron

Saffron is considered one of the world’s most expensive spices, thanks to the large amount of labor and blossoms it takes to produce just a small amount of the spice. If you can manage to get some you’re your kitchen, saffron can be used in many dishes to spice things up and help with asthma, whooping cough, trouble sleeping, heartburn, depression, and more. It’s also a good source of vitamins and minerals such as manganese, iron, potassium, and vitamin C. Serving Size (one tablespoon), 1.6 milligrams of vitamin C (3% DV), 6.2 calories

Cayenne Pepper

If you can find a way to incorporate a tablespoon of cayenne pepper into your meals, you’ll enjoy 4 mg of vitamin C in your diet, or 7% of the daily recommended value for adults. Cayenne pepper is commonly used in spicy dishes, or in bland foods such as rice and beans to give them a kick of flavor. Serving Size (1 tablespoon), 4 milligrams of vitamin C (7% DV), 16 calories

Oranges

Oranges may be one of the most well-known and widely used sources of vitamin C. Fresh squeezed orange juice can be a rich and convenient source of vitamin C, but eating the fruit itself—including the pulp—can provide several other health benefits. Oranges are also a great source of folic acid, potassium, and B vitamins. Serving Size (1 orange), 69.7 milligrams of vitamin C (116% DV), 61 calories

Most people know that vitamin C—an antioxidant—is the go-to treatment for cold and flu symptoms. And while the effect of vitamin C on the immune system may vary from person to person, getting enough of it in your diet is essential to the health of your skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels.

P.S. Take a look at the 5 veggies that boost female metabolism and burn off lower belly fat.



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